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Volkswagen Jetta, Golf, GTI: 1993-1999, Cabrio 1995-2002 (A3) jetta III 2.0 5 speed idle rpm problem


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Last Post: Oct 27, 2004 11:08 PM Last Post By: bearing01
stolenvw

Posts: 8
Registered: 09/14/04
jetta III 2.0 5 speed idle rpm problem
Posted: Oct 27, 2004 1:48 AM
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The problem I have is the rpm flutters when you step on the gas but if you let off the flutter goes away, almost like there is not enough fuel pressure. sometimes the car will stutter when your going along at a constant speed, and sometimes the car will just stall out when your driving. what could it be. it has had a recent tune up and the timing is on the money per bently manual specifications.
thanks
stolenvw@yahoo.com
bearing01

Posts: 228
Registered: 05/24/04
Re: jetta III 2.0 5 speed idle rpm problem
Posted: Oct 27, 2004 7:57 AM   in response to: stolenvw in response to: stolenvw
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Sounds like an ignition problem where your car is misfiring. To troubleshoot:

1. Inspect spark plugs. Remove and take a look at the plugs. When removing plug wires do not yank on the chords. They must be removed by pulling on the part that connects to the spark plug. A spark plug puller can be purchased at your local autoparts store for under $10. If you damage the wires then a new set will cost $100usd. With the plugs removed the tip should look un-worn and the gap around 0.028in. The color should be light gray to coffee-with-cream color. If carbon fouled then that's sign of rich air/fuel and perhaps misfiring. When putting the plugs back in use a torque wrench and tighten to the specified torque in the bentley. While they're out just as well replace the plugs with some Bosch FR8DS @ $0.99/ea

2. If the new plugs didn't fix your problem then the next thing to inspect is the plug wires. When you're accellerating the spark plugs need a higher voltage to fire and if there is a break in the insulation the plug wires could ark to each other or to the engine, causing misfire. At night you may want to spray down the wires and distributor with a water spray bottle and get someone to rev up the car. If you see sparks fly around then it's probably your wires. Replace with new ones.

3. Pop off the cover of the distributor and inspect the metal tabs within. Makesure none have been scored/burnt too badly and the rotor arm. Make sure there are no cracks in the distributor cap.

4. Inspect the coil for cracks. The bentley will tell you how to measure the resistance of the primary and secondary windings of the coil. The primary should be 1 to a couple ohms and the secondary in the 1000's of ohms range.

Good Luck
John
goodcarma

Posts: 19
Registered: 09/28/04
Re: jetta III 2.0 5 speed idle rpm problem
Posted: Oct 27, 2004 4:26 PM   in response to: bearing01 in response to: bearing01
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One thing you could try is check the mass air flow sensor and the air tube running from the air mass sensor and the intake. If the inside of these parts are covered with oil, it can cause the air mass sensor to constantly try to adjust the air flow. We had a Jetta with a very similar problem, and we replaced ignition parts, with little improvement. We found something in the the Bentley Manual that mentioned oil in the air intake system. We cleaned things up, and the problem went 95% away.

It is a simple (and cheap) thing to try.
bearing01

Posts: 228
Registered: 05/24/04
Re: jetta III 2.0 5 speed idle rpm problem
Posted: Oct 27, 2004 11:08 PM   in response to: goodcarma in response to: goodcarma
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My 97 has this problem where oil from the PCV valve leaks into the intake hose. To my knowledge they fixed this problem on 98+ model cars. Haul off the intake hose that attaches to your air filter box on the left side of the engine bay (where the MAF sensor lives). If you don't see oil in the 3" hose then chances are that your model car had this problem fixed.

Theory has it that oil in the intake can get on the MAF sensor and screw the sensor and air/fuel mixture can't get adjusted properly by the ECM. I have found that cleaning the air intake hose and the MAF sensor has diminishing returns with regard to performance. This "oil in the air intake" doesn't seem to be all that big of a performance problem. More than anything it is an annoyance.

Message was edited by: bearing01


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